Olive Ridley Turtles

Olive Ridley Turtles – Homeward bound hatchlings

The Olive Ridley Turtles have been to known to visit the beaches of a tiny village called Velas to nest. Located in the State of Maharashtra, this village has been playing host to the endangered species for several years now and every year, during the hatching season an Annual Turtle Festival is organized, which is visited by hundreds of tourists from across the country. Captured here are some pictures related to my trip to Velas in February 2014.

Velas Village
Velas Village

Velas is a tiny village in the Ratnagiri district on the western coast of Maharashtra. This remote village shot into prominence for the Olive Ridley turtles that visit its beaches to lay their eggs.

 

Bankot Village
Bankot Village

Bankot is a small town on the south shore of the entrance of the river Savitri and the passageway to reach Velas. It is known for its fort by the same name which is also visited by the touring visitors of Velas.

 

Bankot Fort
Bankot Fort

Bankot fort which is located on top of a hill was controlled by Adilshahi before it fell into the hands of the Portuguese. It was later rechristened as Himmatgad by the Marathas after they gained control of the fort from the Portuguese.

 

Bankot Fort Bastion
Bankot Fort Bastion

Pictured here is one of the remaining bastions of the Bankot fort.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

The eggs of the Olive Ridley turtles are protected by the local NGO called Sahyadri Nisarg Mitra, which has been involved in turtle conservation in and around Velas. We were fortunate that there were a few hatchlings ready to be released into the sea, during our visit to Velas.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

The Olive Ridley turtle (Lepidochelys Olivacea) is named for the greenish colouration of the adults. They are one of the smallest of the sea turtles measuring about 2 feet in length and approx. 40 kg in weight. During their arduous journey towards water, they face several obstacles due to artificial lights, rocks, footprints, driftwood and even predators like birds, dogs and fishes.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

While the Olive Ridley turtles are solitary, they travel thousands of miles every year, and come together as a group only once a year for the ‘arribada’, when females return to the beaches where they had hatched, to lay eggs.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

The temperature of the sand in which the eggs incubate determines the sex of the hatchlings. A warmer temperature would yield female offspring while a cooler temperature yields males.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

Once out of their nest, the Olive Ridley turtles are guided by the light and they quickly make their way to the water. They make use of cues such as the slope of the beach, the white foam of the waves and the light of the sea’s horizon. At the time of shooting this release in Velas, we were advised against the use of the camera flash as it would have confused the hatchlings.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

Splash! The first of the turtles finally hits the water after its long and tedious journey across the beach. Once the turtles reach the water, they begin what is called as the ‘swimming frenzy’ or hyperactive swimming that helps them to survive their predators till they reach the ocean currents.

 

Olive Ridley Turtles
Olive Ridley Turtles

Amid cheers and claps, all the turtles reach the water and are swept around by the waves for a while before they begin to disappear one by one into the sea. Once in water, their “lost years’ begin and their whereabouts will not be known for a very long time till they to the coastal areas to forage.